IaaS, PaaS, and SaaS explained

You might be reading a lot about Cloud computing and see three acronyms frequently: IaaS, PaaS, Saas.  Cloud providers offer their services according to these three fundamental models:

Infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS)

This is the most basic model which is essentially your virtual machines in a cloud data center.  You set up, configure, and manage VMs that run in the data center infrastructure, and you put whatever you want on them.  A hypervisor such as Hyper-V runs the virtual machines as guests.  Pools of hypervisors installed at a data center can support large numbers of virtual machines and the ability to scale services up and down according to customers’ varying requirements.  Windows Azure, Hortonworks Data Platform, Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2)Rackspace, and Google Compute Engine are the most popular examples.

Traits of IaaS:

  • You Build/Upload Virtual Machines to a DC on the Internet – e.g. Windows Azure
  • You PAY for time/resources used and the software in your VM’s
  • Your virtual machines RUN on hardware shared with other organizations
  • You manage ALL aspects of the software stack inside your virtual machines
  • You perform OS updates and manage runtime and middleware
  • VM’s can be moved to/from the Cloud and your own data center
  • App development is unchanged

Platform-as-a-service (PaaS)

With PaaS, a provider delivers a computing platform, typically including operating system, programming language execution environment, database, and web server.  You don’t have to worry about OS updates or managing runtime and middleware.  The provider manages the hardware and software infrastructure and you just use the service.  It is usually a layer on top of IaaS.  Examples are Microsoft Azure SQL Database, HDInsight, AWS Elastic Beanstalk, Windows Azure BLOB Storage, and Google App Engine.

Using a Windows Azure BLOB Storage example:

  • You SUBSCRIBE to the service and create a unique name
  • You GIVE Blobs(Files) to the Storage Service – simple API or REST
  • The service provides resilience and scale, you don’t have to.
  • You ask for them back – you don’t care or know where they really are (which VM’s)
  • The service and the fabric controller make sure your data is stored so there is no single point of failure
  • You pay for the amount of storage you use – the service manages everything
  • The service can also geo-replicate, provide disaster recovery

Software-as-a-service (SaaS)

With SaaS, users are provided access to application software and databases. Cloud providers manage the infrastructure and platforms that run the applications.  SaaS is sometimes referred to as “on-demand software”.  Google Apps (which includes GMail), Salesforce, and Microsoft Office 365 are good examples.

Traits of SaaS:

  • Complete apps you use
  • Subscribe, on-board, normally pay for the # of users who use the app
  • No access to underlying platform
  • Software may support some customizations
  • Shared hardware, platform and finished software across multiple customers
  • A layer on top of PaaS

More info:

Windows Azure – Write, Run or Use Software

But what can I *do* with Windows Azure? Create (Free) Websites and Applications

IaaS, PaaS and SaaS Terms Clearly Explained and Defined

Cloud Jargon Unwound: Distinguishing SaaS, IaaS and PaaS

What Is Cloud Computing?

Cloud Service Models (IaaS, SaaS, PaaS) + How Microsoft Office 365, Azure Fit In

Microsoft Azure for Enterprises

Cloud Models (IaaS, PaaS, SaaS) explained with examples

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Presentation slides for Modern Data Warehousing

Thanks to everyone who attended my session “Modern Data Warehousing” at the Central New Jersey SQL User Group yesterday.  The abstract for my session is below.  I hope you enjoyed it!

Here is the PowerPoint presentation: Modern Data Warehousing

Modern Data Warehousing

The traditional data warehouse has served us well for many years, but new trends are causing it to break in four different ways: data growth, fast query expectations from users, non-relational/unstructured data, and cloud-born data.  How can you prevent this from happening?  Enter the modern data warehouse, which is able to handle and excel with these new trends.  It handles all types of data (Hadoop), provides a way to easily interface with all these types of data (PolyBase), and can handle “big data” and provide fast queries.  Is there one appliance that can support this modern data warehouse?  Yes!  It is the Analytics Platform System (APS) from Microsoft (formally called the Parallel Data Warehouse or PDW), which is a Massively Parallel Processing (MPP) appliance that has been recently updated (v2 AU1).  In this session I will dig into the details of the modern data warehouse and APS.  I will give an overview of the APS hardware and software architecture, identify what makes APS different, and demonstrate the increased performance.  In addition I will discuss how Hadoop, HDInsight, and PolyBase fit into this new modern data warehouse.

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Modern Data Warehousing Presentation

I will be presenting the session “Modern Data Warehousing” tomorrow (Wednesday, August 13th) at the Central New Jersey SQL User Group at 6:30pm.  The abstract for my session is below.  I hope you can make it!

Modern Data Warehousing

The traditional data warehouse has served us well for many years, but new trends are causing it to break in four different ways: data growth, fast query expectations from users, non-relational/unstructured data, and cloud-born data.  How can you prevent this from happening?  Enter the modern data warehouse, which is able to handle and excel with these new trends.  It handles all types of data (Hadoop), provides a way to easily interface with all these types of data (PolyBase), and can handle “big data” and provide fast queries.  Is there one appliance that can support this modern data warehouse?  Yes!  It is the Analytics Platform System (APS) from Microsoft (formally called the Parallel Data Warehouse or PDW), which is a Massively Parallel Processing (MPP) appliance that has been recently updated (v2 AU1).  In this session I will dig into the details of the modern data warehouse and APS.  I will give an overview of the APS hardware and software architecture, identify what makes APS different, and demonstrate the increased performance.  In addition I will discuss how Hadoop, HDInsight, and PolyBase fit into this new modern data warehouse.

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24 Hours of PASS videos online

All the videos for the sessions at 24 Hours of PASS (Spring 2014) are available for free.  Check the session schedule for a complete list.  Also, many of the PASS virtual chapters have recordings of their meetings online.  Enjoy!

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SQL Server Agent job steps vs SSIS

When doing ETL, you have the choice of using T-SQL or SSIS (see When to use T-SQL or SSIS for ETL).  If you decide T-SQL is the way to go and you just want to execute a bunch of T-SQL statements (individually or within a stored procedure), it’s still a good idea to wrap them in SSIS Execute SQL Tasks because you can use logging, auditing and error handling that SSIS provides that T-SQL does not.  You can also easily run SSIS Execute SQL Tasks in parallel, so if those tasks are calling stored procedures that means you are able to run stored procedures in parallel.  Other benefits for using SSIS instead of a SQL Server Agent job include:

  • The ability to use a project data connection manager, so if the connection info changes you only need to change it in one spot
  • You can create checkpoints for restarting
  • You can add logic to check if packages have run by querying the status log (SSISDB catalog) instead of manually looking at the SQL Server agent job steps
  • You can do reporting off of the auditing info you capture
  • You can use select statements against the SSIS history for analysis (history stored in SSISDB catalog), which you don’t have for job steps in SQL Server agent
  • Ease of maintenance (but depends on knowledge of SSIS vs knowledge of SQL Server)

 

Posted in SQLServerPedia Syndication, SSIS | 2 Comments

IT books that should be on your shelf

I have a lot of books on my shelves dealing with business intelligence, data warehousing, master data management, and consulting.  Below are my favorites:

Data Warehouse Books:

Ralph Kimball Books

Building the Data Warehouse

Corporate Information Factory

DW 2.0

Mastering Data Warehouse Design

Data Warehouse from Architecture to Implementation

Microsoft SQL Server 2012 Internals

Star Schema: The complete reference

Microsoft Big Data Solutions

Business Intelligence Books:

Expert Cube Development with SSAS Multidimensional Models

Pro SQL Server 2012 BI Solutions

Business Intelligence Competency Centers

Data Mining with Microsoft SQL Server 2008

Performance Dashboards

How To Measure Anything

Dimensional Modeling: In a Business Intelligence Environment

The Balanced Scorecard

Information Dashboard Design

Microsoft SQL Server 2014 Business Intelligence Development

Reporting with Microsoft SQL Server 2012 (shameless plug of my book)

Master Data Management Books:

Master Data Management

Microsoft SQL Server 2012 Master Data Services

Data Quality: The Accuracy Dimension

Consulting Books:

How to win friends and influence people

Influence: Science and practice

The Secrets of Consulting: A Guide to Giving and Getting Advice Successfully

More Secrets of Consulting

The Rational Guide to: IT Consulting

The Nomadic Developer

Agile Project Management With Scrum

Posted in Career, SQLServerPedia Syndication | 1 Comment

PASS BA Conference 2014: Sessions Recordings Now Available

All PASS Business Analytics Conference 2014 recordings are now available.  If you purchased the online sessions, to view, log on to your myPASS account, enter your activation code, and watch the sessions from myRecordings.  You can also purchase all recordings on a USB drive.  While there, check out mine: Building an Effective Data Warehouse Architecture

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Presentation slides for Modern Data Warehousing

Thanks to everyone who attended my session “Modern Data Warehousing” for Pragmatic Works last Thursday.  The abstract for my session is below and the recording is available here.  I hope you enjoyed it.

Here is the PowerPoint presentation: Modern Data Warehousing

Modern Data Warehousing

The traditional data warehouse has served us well for many years, but new trends are causing it to break in four different ways: data growth, fast query expectations from users, non-relational/unstructured data, and cloud-born data.  How can you prevent this from happening?  Enter the modern data warehouse, which is able to handle and excel with these new trends.  It handles all types of data (Hadoop), provides a way to easily interface with all these types of data (PolyBase), and can handle “big data” and provide fast queries.  Is there one appliance that can support this modern data warehouse?  Yes!  It is the Parallel Data Warehouse (PDW) from Microsoft, which is a Massively Parallel Processing (MPP) appliance that has been recently updated (v2 AU1).  In this session I will dig into the details of the modern data warehouse and PDW.  I will give an overview of the PDW hardware and software architecture, identify what makes PDW different, and demonstrate the increased performance.  In addition I will discuss how Hadoop, HDInsight, and PolyBase fit into this new modern data warehouse.

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Presentation slides for Houston SQLSaturday

Thanks to everyone who attended my two sessions at SQLSaturday in Houston (more info).  Here are the abstracts and PowerPoint links:

Best Practices to Deliver BI Solutions

If your company is planning to build a data warehouse or BI solution, you need to be aware that BI projects have high failure rates. Gartner says between 70% to 80% of corporate business intelligence projects fail. And with “big data” adding more complexity you can expect even more failures. However, the major causes of these failures are well known and can be avoided by implementing a set of best practices.

I have worked on dozens of end-to-end BI projects and have seen my share of successes and failures. I will talk about the reasons BI projects fail and share best practices and lessons learned so your BI project will fall into the “successful” category.

Here is the PowerPoint presentation: Best Practices to Deliver BI Solutions

Enhancing your career: Building your personal brand

In three years I went from a complete unknown to a popular blogger, speaker at PASS Summit, and a SQL Server MVP.  Along the way I saw my yearly income triple.  Is it because I know some secret?  Is it because I am a genius?  No!  It is just about laying out your career path, setting goals, and doing the work.  It’s about building your personal brand and stepping out of your comfort zone.  It’s about overcoming your fear of taking risks.  If you can do those things, you will be rewarded.  I will discuss how you too can go from unknown to well-known.  I will talk about building your community presence by blogging, presenting, writing articles and books, twitter, LinkedIn, certifications, interviewing, networking, and consulting and contracting.  Your first step to enhancing your career will be to attend this session!

Here is the PowerPoint presentation: Enhancing your career: Building your personal brand

Posted in Business Intelligence, Career, Presentation, Session, SQLServerPedia Syndication | 1 Comment

Presentation Slides for Building an Effective Data Warehouse Architecture

Thanks to everyone who attended my session “Building an Effective Data Warehouse Architecture” at the PASS Business Analytics conference.  The abstract is below.  I hope you enjoyed it!

Here is the PowerPoint presentation: Building an Effective Data Warehouse Architecture

Building an Effective Data Warehouse Architecture

You’re a DBA and your boss asks you to determine if a data warehouse would help the company.  So many questions pop into your head: Why use a data warehouse?  What is the best methodology to use when creating a data warehouse?  Should I use a normalized or dimensional approach?  What is the difference between the Kimball and Inmon methodologies?  Does the new Tabular model in SQL Server 2012 change things?  What is the difference between a data warehouse and a data mart?  Is there any hardware I can purchase that is optimized for a data warehouse?  What if I have a ton of data? During this session James will help you to answer these questions so your response to your boss will provoke amazement and lead to a big raise.  Or at least help to lead you down the correct path!

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